RED BLOOD CELL & FIBRIN, SEM - stock photo
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RED BLOOD CELL & FIBRIN, SEM

This scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicted a closer view of a number of red blood cells found enmeshed in a fibrinous matrix on the luminal surface of an indwelling vascular catheter; Magnified 7766x. In this instance, the indwelling catheter was a tube that was left in place creating a patent portal directly into a blood vessel. Some of the erythrocytes are grouped in a stack known as a "Rouleaux formation". Note the biconcave cytomorphologic shape of each erythrocyte, which increases the surface area of these hemoglobin-filled cells, thereby promoting a greater degree of gas exchange, which is their primary function in an in vivo setting. In their adult phase, these cells possess no nucleus. What appears to be irregularly-shaped chunks of debris are actually fibrin clumps, which when inside the living organism, function as a key component in the process of blood clot formation, acting to entrap the red blood cells in a mesh-like latticework of proteinaceous strands, thereby stabilizing and strengthening the clot, in much the same way as rebar acts to strengthen and reinforce cement.

Credit
BSIP

Dimensions
3630 x 2467 pixels

Print Size @ 300 dpi
12 x 8 inches / 31 x 21 cm

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